what is the difference between the two code snippets

I have recently been thinking about the difference between the two ways of defining an array:

  1. int[] array
  2. int array[]

Is there a difference?

Replay

They are semantically identical. The int array[] syntax was only added to help C programmers get used to java.

int[] array is much preferable, and less confusing.

There is one slight difference, if you happen to declare more than one variable in the same declaration:

int[] a, b;  // Both a and b are arrays of type int
int c[], d;  // WARNING: c is an array, but d is just a regular int

Note that this is bad coding style, although the compiler will almost certainly catch your error the moment you try to use d.

There is no difference.

I prefer the type[] name format at is is clear that the variable is an array (less looking around to find out what it is).

EDIT:

Oh wait there is a difference (I forgot because I never declare more than one variable at a time):

int[] foo, bar; // both are arrays
int foo[], bar; // foo is an array, bar is an int.

No, these are the same. However

byte[] rowvector, colvector, matrix[];

is equivalent to:

byte rowvector[], colvector[], matrix[][];

Taken from Java Specification. That means that

int a[],b;
int []a,b;

are different. I would not recommend either of these multiple declarations. Easiest to read would (probably) be:

int[] a;
int[] b;

From section 10.2 of the Java Language Specification:

The [] may appear as part of the type at the beginning of the declaration, or as part of the declarator for a particular variable, or both, as in this example:

 byte[] rowvector, colvector, matrix[];

This declaration is equivalent to:

byte rowvector[], colvector[], matrix[][];

Personally almost all the Java code I've ever seen uses the first form, which makes more sense by keeping all the type information about the variable in one place. I wish the second form were disallowed, to be honest... but such is life...

Fortunately I don't think I've ever seen this (valid) code:

String[] rectangular[] = new String[10][10];

The two commands are the same thing.

You can use the syntax to declare multiple objects:

int[] arrayOne, arrayTwo; //both arrays

int arrayOne[], intOne; //one array one int

see: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/second_edition/html/arrays.doc.html

No difference.

Quoting from Sun:

The [] may appear as part of the type at the beginning of the declaration, or as part of the declarator for a particular variable, or both, as in this example: byte[] rowvector, colvector, matrix[];

This declaration is equivalent to: byte rowvector[], colvector[], matrix[][];

There is no real difference; however,

double[] items = new double[10];

is preferred as it clearly indicates that the type is an array.

There isn't any difference between the two; both declare an array of ints. However, the former is preferred since it keeps the type information all in one place. The latter is only really supported for the benefit of C/C++ programmers moving to Java.

There is no difference, but Sun recommends putting it next to the type as explained here

It is an alternative form, which was borrowed from C, upon which java is based.

As a curiosity, there are three ways to define a valid main method in java:

  • public static void main(String[] args)
  • public static void main(String args[])
  • public static void main(String... args)

Both are equally valid. The int puzzle[] form is however discouraged, the int[] puzzle is preferred according to the coding conventions. See also the official Java arrays tutorial:

Similarly, you can declare arrays of other types:

byte[] anArrayOfBytes;
short[] anArrayOfShorts;
long[] anArrayOfLongs;
float[] anArrayOfFloats;
double[] anArrayOfDoubles;
boolean[] anArrayOfBooleans;
char[] anArrayOfChars;
String[] anArrayOfStrings;

You can also place the square brackets after the array's name:

float anArrayOfFloats[]; // this form is discouraged

However, convention discourages this form; the brackets identify the array type and should appear with the type designation.

Note the last paragraph.

I recommend reading the official Sun/Oracle tutorials rather than some 3rd party ones. You would otherwise risk end up in learning bad practices.

The most preferred option is int[] a - because int[] is the type, and a is the name. (your 2nd option is the same as this, with misplaced space)

Functionally there is no difference between them.

In Java, these are simply different syntactic methods of saying the same thing.

The Java Language Specification says:

The [] may appear as part of the type at the beginning of the declaration,
or as part of the declarator for a particular variable, or both, as in this
example:

byte[] rowvector, colvector, matrix[];

This declaration is equivalent to:

byte rowvector[], colvector[], matrix[][];

Thus they will result in exactly the same byte code.

There is no difference in functionality between both styles of declaration. Both declare array of int.

But int[] a keeps type information together and is more verbose so I prefer it.

They are the same, but there is an important difference between these statements:

// 1.
int regular, array[];
// 2.
int[] regular, array;

in 1. regular is just an int, as opposed to 2. where both regular and array are arrays of int's.

The second statement you have is therefore preferred, since it is more clear. The first form is also discouraged according to this tutorial on Oracle.

They're the same. One is more readable (to some) than the other.

They are completely equivalent. int [] array is the preferred style. int array[] is just provided as an equivalent, C-compatible style.

Both have the same meaning. However, the existence of these variants also allows this:

int[] a, b[];

which is the same as:

int[] a;
int[][] b;

However, this is horrible coding style and should never be done.

Yep, exactly the same. Personally, I prefer

int[] integers;

because it makes it immediately obvious to anyone reading your code that integers is an array of int's, as opposed to

int integers[];

which doesn't make it all that obvious, particularly if you have multiple declarations in one line. But again, they are equivalent, so it comes down to personal preference.

Check out this page on arrays in Java for more in depth examples.

Both are ok. I suggest to pick one and stick with it. (I do the second one)

While the int integers[] solution roots in the C language (and can be thus considered the "normal" approach), many people find int[] integers more logical as it disallows to create variables of different types (i.e. an int and an array) in one declaration (as opposed to the C-style declaration).

Category: java Time: 2008-09-24 Views: 1
Tags: java arrays

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